Care Settings

Care professionals of all disciplines are using gardening to help people enjoy life to the full and to augment and enrich day to day life for the people they care for.
Carers also use gardening to help maintain their own health and well-being.

Are you a care worker, an unpaid carer, a care manager, care referral agent, a health or care professional visiting care settings, or a therapist wanting to offer gardening as part of your practice in cares services?

Via the Trellis Project Network, you can contact others who use gardening to augment care services, both to learn from and to exchange ideas, discuss concerns and perhaps solve problems.

The Trellis network of therapeutic gardening projects is varied and includes groups offering services to:

  • People living with life limiting conditions in palliative care facilities
  • People living with dementia
  • Children with complex disabilities having a spell in respite care
  • Individuals living with neurological conditions or head injuries who need care services or supported living arrangements.
  • People who are becoming frail and need more care than can be provided at home
  • People who are receiving care services at home
  • Disabled people, including those with physical or sensory disabilities, and with multiple and complex support needs.

Browse the Map and Directory of projects to get a sense of the projects in the network or contact us if you would like help to find projects working in your area or with the same target group.

Support Services Learn new horticulture or care skills at our Training Days, pick up new ideas at one of our Good Practice events, and share news and tips with over 150 delegates at our Annual Conference.

Contact us for help, advice and a friendly chat about your therapeutic plans and questions – we’ll try to find all the answers you need via our Query Service.

Browse our Factsheets on everything from ‘Dementia and Gardening’ to easier, ‘Adaptive GardeningTM’ ideas.

Explore some of the research evidence relevant to therapeutic gardening. Being aware of the pertinent studies helps you understand how gardening fits within your evidence-based practice.